Why the media matter in Washington

Looking for opportunities to create economic growth, we should not overlook an invisible export. Media is one of the greater Washington region’s largest industries. News is the reason. 

I discussed this recently on “What’s Working in Washington” with J.J. Green, national security correspondent for WTOP-FM and host of the TargetUSA Podcast, Brian Fanzo, founder and chief executive of social strategy consulting firm iSocialFanz, and Judy Kurtz, In the Know columnist for The Hill.  

For all of them, Washington’s importance as a media center really begins with news. News is different from mere information. News is information that is important and worth knowing. What makes news worth knowing? In other words, what gives news its relevance?  

Green said for him the relevance of news begins with novelty, “News is not what people are talking about; it’s what they don’t know.” This makes Washington, D.C. a generator of lots of news, or as he puts it, “Hollywood when it comes to news.” The confluence of the White House, Congress, the Pentagon and other cabinet departments, courts, diplomats, businesses, professionals, and more ensures that there is always something important happening. 

But it is not just novelty. Information can be novel but trivial. Previously unknown information that can affect a person’s life, situation or prospects is news. Impact – consequentiality — is what separates the newsworthy from the trivial. Much of what happens in Washington, D.C. has the possibility of widespread impact.  

The region itself is a news-generating machine, and its productivity is enhanced by the visits of celebrities. The shared trait of all celebrities is that lots of people pay attention to them and listen to what they say. Kurtz sees how celebrities act when they come to town: they are often star-struck by the politicians and political leaders whom they meet. For many of them, “D.C. is their Hollywood,” a place where they attempt to convert their fame into social good by influencing politicians. And in doing so, they create news. 

Fanzo observed that D.C. also creates its own celebrities based on titles and position. As people serve in government as senators, congressman, presidents and judges, they become famous. This makes their words and actions newsworthy. Add to this the leaders of the countless trade groups, not-for-profits, and commercial businesses operating in our region.  

News originated in our region supports a vibrant and dynamic media industry, stretching from traditional media companies to new media startups. It’s an industry that is supported by technology, public relations and advertising businesses. Fanzo, a recent returnee to the D.C. region, has really seen the change and is “beyond impressed in the tech community, entrepreneurship and different brands” that have created exciting business opportunities 

News matters to our region’s economy. 

That is why our region must take so seriously preserving the veracity of news. While other regions of the nation may be concerned about “fake news” as a political issue, our region’s economic health depends upon the objective truth of our news. Without veracity and trust, news loses its value, both politically and economically. For our journalists, veracity and trust in the news is not a theoretical discussion. Nor should it be for those of us concerned with economic development. 

News can drive our region forward. As Green puts it, “the opportunities are just off the charts.” 

At a time where we are looking for industries that can create economic opportunity and jobs, news might be our most meaningful export of all. 

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